Two Pickle Yolks in Featured For Their Lip-smacking Unusual Art!

Two Pickle Yolks in Featured For Their Lip-smacking Unusual Art!

Blog Media Mentions Review

Two of our Pickle Yolk Books titles, The Susu Pals and Vee Loved Garlic, and their inimitable illustrators Alicia Souza and Kunal Kundu are featured in this Hindustan Times piece by Rachel Lopez on the changing face of children’s books in India: ‘Kids books are getting darker, cooler, nuttier.’

She writes:

“No pigtails. No Aadarsh Balaks. No preachy grownups. No morals at the end of the story. As children’s books in India get a makeover, their illustrations are brightening up too. Over the last five years, animation artists, muralists, graphic designers and doodlers have been lending heir skills to books for kids, redrawing the lines of what constitutes art for India’s young people.

Some of the work is almost cinematic – moody vampire landscapes, grandmas that swing up coconut trees. Others are clearly tongue in cheek – jokes about poo, gags sneaked in for parents. But each is a step towards a new visual language for kids, one where the rules are elastic – and a new adventure is just around the corner.”

Excerpts from the feature:

On The Susu Pals and Alicia Souza

What? You never had a friend you’d do susu with? Rhea and Dia do everything together, like best buds. Until Isha joins their class. Souza’s cheery work brightens up the story of friendship and getting along. “I had to make sure the visuals included the kids and parents’ point of view,” she says. “And we wanted handwriting, not set fonts.” Today’s stories are letting kids take control and learn lessons themselves, she adds. “Some grown-ups were a little scandalised by the title, but there are plenty of pee and poo books in India now.”

On Vee Loved Garlic and Kunal Kundu

 

Vee loves garlic. But Vee is a vampire and her family believes it will kill her. Can she convince them she’ll be ok? Kundu’s art gives the tale of discovery and free will the animation-film treatment. Hisworld is mildly macabre, dramatic and Halloweeny. “Childlike drawings don’t necessarily work for children’s books,” Kundu says. “You have to work on composition, colour choice, what’s in focus, what angle you’re presenting, the point of view of the child or the adult reader. The reader is like a film audience.” Most publishers think dark visuals are unsuitable for kids, Kundu adds, “but when Neil Gaiman does it, it’s automatically fine”. The double standard works for fees too. Kunku says Indian publishers pay only a quarter of what equally skilledartists get in the West.

Read the entire feature here.

Click here to buy your copies of these books.

Scroll.in Features Boo! When My Sister Died

Scroll.in Features Boo! When My Sister Died

Blog Media Mentions Review

We have been long time admirers of writer-author-editor-environment crusader Bijal Vachharajani’s words. And so, it gives us immense pleasure to have her talk about Boo! When My Sister Died in this insightful feature at scroll.in on how bereavement and grief is finally being talked about in books for children in India. She writes:

“In it, the protagonist Noorie’s sister dies and the world, as the girl knows it, changes. As Noorie yearns for Zoya’s return, Jha and Benegal unspool a story about coming to terms with the loss of a loved one. Like a child talking, the book is often straight and direct: “That night my sister Zoya was away at the hospital, I dreamt of her. The next morning Mummy said Zoya was dead. I cried.” And yet, the picture book ends on a note of hope.”

The beautiful poignantly haunting illustration of the child and her pet standing alone at the top of the hill is by Gautam Benegal from Boo! When My Sister Died.

Read the entire feature here.

Written by Richa Jha and illustrated by Gautam Benegal, Boo! When My Sister Died is our latest release.  Click here to know more about the book and here to buy a copy.

Boo! When My Sister Died in The Indian Express

Boo! When My Sister Died in The Indian Express

Blog Media Mentions Review

Paromita Chakrabarti’s recommendations for kids’ summer reads in today’s Indian Express includes Boo! When My Sister Died.

She writes:

“If death is bewildering for grown-ups, how can children face up to it? Learning to deal with loss is never easy, but children’s literature in particular, rarely deals with the inevitability of death or coming to terms with grief. Over the last few years, however, a bunch of thoughtful picture books such as Oliver Jeffers’s The Heart and the Bottle and Rebecca Cobb’s Missing Mommy have explored the void created by the death of a loved one. Indian picture books, however, have rarely ventured into this zone, barring a few stray forays like My Grandfather Aajoba by Taruja Parande.

In the years since Richa Jha launched her independent publishing house Pickle Yolk Books, she has put together a small but well-curated list of books dealing with diversity, differences and now, death. Her new book is the story of Noorie, who has lost her sister Zoya, but finds herself unprepared for the overwhelming void it opens up in her life. She watches over her mother and her pet, Bruno, scared that they would leave her, too, frequents their favourite haunts where Zoya’s presence still lingers in the air. But, most of all, she is overcome by anger at her sister’s disappearance; at the overtures of Zoya’s best friend Dhara to draw her out, and, at her mother’s insistence that Zoya would always be a part of their lives.

Gautam Benegal’s evocative illustrations are the highlight of this beautiful volume. He captures Zoya’s disorientation and the messy nature of grief with great subtlety, aided in no small part by Jha’s economy of words and quiet understanding of the hollowness that loss engenders.”

Read the entire feature here.

Click here to know more about the book and here to buy a copy.

 

The Wonderoom Wonder

The Wonderoom Wonder

Blog

We were overwhelmed by the commendable work Rajiv Gandhi Foundation is doing with children from the settlements in and around central Delhi. Their beautiful library Wonderoom is the kind of lively, book-laden, creatively charged spaces we need in our midst. These are pics from a session our publisher Richa Jha had with this bright and motivated bunch of children at Wonderoom this morning. To see how books, stories and art can transform lives, do drop by at Jawahar Bhavan and get them talking.

 

 

Some BOOKSIDAISY Love!

Some BOOKSIDAISY Love!

Blog Media Mentions

We have been a big time fan and a keen silent admirer of journalist, author and blogger Lalita Iyer‘s writings. And so, when she started @booksidaisies on Instagram to feature books she and her son Re have enjoyed reading, we lost no time in sending them some of our titles!

And the verdict is OUT!

First up was this delightful post with Re reading The Unboy Boy!

“Am I a boy?,” Gagan asks his mother. “You are, my Duckie,” she says. “The loveliest, gentlest one who always makes me proud.” Like her, I have an unboy boy too, and I am constantly struggling with conventional definitions of masculinity and a world that will not let a kind, gentle and sensitive boy be. A world that’s in a hurry to put him in the “unboy” box. For a long time, Re has been at the receiving end of this, not just from boys but girls too. Now he is a crusader for “there are no boy things and girl things. If you are doing it, it’s your thing.” Unboy boy is a beautiful book by @richajharj with illustrations by Gautam Benegal that addresses questions children often have: “Am I boy enough?” Or “am I girl enough?” Through Gagan’s story, the book celebrates who you are, just the way you are. And tells you that you are always enough.

A post shared by booksidaisies (@booksidaisies) on

Then came these warm words on Thatha at School, and we have been over the moon since!

If you think we are grinning from ear to ear, well, we ARE! Thank you, Lalita and Re! I hope you enjoy reading our other titles too.

The Unboy Boy is back at NutSpace

The Unboy Boy is back at NutSpace

Blog

We can’t stop cooing about the humongous love NutSpace has always shown towards our books. This time, they have introduced The Unboy Boy (written by Richa Jha, illustrated by Gautam Benegal) to this sprightly bunch of children. It brings us much joy to see them so totally engrossed in the book!

That’s not all! Rohini Vij, who runs the show at NutSpace, has sent us this clipping of a dramatised reading of the book:

Rohini, NutSpace, thank you! You rock!

Pickle Yolk Books in the Publishers Weekly Bologna 2017 Wrap-up!

Pickle Yolk Books in the Publishers Weekly Bologna 2017 Wrap-up!

Awards and Recognition Blog

I am doing my best to sound modest and all, BUT over 1.2k exhibitors, over 26k visitors, etc etc, and who finds a little mention in the Publishers Weekly wrap-up of this year’s Bologna Children’s Book Fair? Guess, guess! My tiny baby Pickle Yolk Books is right up there, standing strong (4th para from the bottom)! Hugs to one and all for always cheering me on through this madness of mine!

Click here for the weblink to the article, or read the the PDF of the same here.

 

 

 

Bologna Children’s Book Fair 2017!

Blog

We have returned from Bologna, all inspired and super charged! Sharing some hastily clicked pics of glimpses of the city centre and of the book fair:

And we are there!

 

You know you’ve landed in Italy because…! This one was right at the airport terminal. 😀

Shamelessly clicking pics of this irresistible window display and the view inside!

@ the BOLOGNA CHILDREN’S BOOK FAIR 2017

 

Gorgeous picture books from around the world at the Book Fair book shop…

 

This insanely eye-popping grandeur of the Sala dello Stabat Mater at the Archiginnàsio Library where the 6 regional BOP Bologna Prizes for the Best Children’s Publisher of the Year. What a proud moment it was for India to have Shobha Viswanath of Karadi Tales as one of the nominated publishers!!

Friends and Hugs @Bologna Children’s Book Fair 2017!

Friends and Hugs @Bologna Children’s Book Fair 2017!

Blog

Nothing comes close to the warmth and joy you feel in getting to hug friends thousands of miles away from home! With the multi faceted and inspiring Shobha Viswanath, author, and publisher of Karadi Tales; the unstoppable, super talented illustrator from India, Ruchi Mhasane, and Eva Sanchez (website link below), another incredibly awesome  illustrator from Spain / Catalonia.

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