Scroll.in Features Boo! When My Sister Died

Scroll.in Features Boo! When My Sister Died

Blog Media Mentions Review

We have been long time admirers of writer-author-editor-environment crusader Bijal Vachharajani’s words. And so, it gives us immense pleasure to have her talk about Boo! When My Sister Died in this insightful feature at scroll.in on how bereavement and grief is finally being talked about in books for children in India. She writes:

“In it, the protagonist Noorie’s sister dies and the world, as the girl knows it, changes. As Noorie yearns for Zoya’s return, Jha and Benegal unspool a story about coming to terms with the loss of a loved one. Like a child talking, the book is often straight and direct: “That night my sister Zoya was away at the hospital, I dreamt of her. The next morning Mummy said Zoya was dead. I cried.” And yet, the picture book ends on a note of hope.”

The beautiful poignantly haunting illustration of the child and her pet standing alone at the top of the hill is by Gautam Benegal from Boo! When My Sister Died.

Read the entire feature here.

Written by Richa Jha and illustrated by Gautam Benegal, Boo! When My Sister Died is our latest release.  Click here to know more about the book and here to buy a copy.

Boo! When My Sister Died in The Indian Express

Boo! When My Sister Died in The Indian Express

Blog Media Mentions Review

Paromita Chakrabarti’s recommendations for kids’ summer reads in today’s Indian Express includes Boo! When My Sister Died.

She writes:

“If death is bewildering for grown-ups, how can children face up to it? Learning to deal with loss is never easy, but children’s literature in particular, rarely deals with the inevitability of death or coming to terms with grief. Over the last few years, however, a bunch of thoughtful picture books such as Oliver Jeffers’s The Heart and the Bottle and Rebecca Cobb’s Missing Mommy have explored the void created by the death of a loved one. Indian picture books, however, have rarely ventured into this zone, barring a few stray forays like My Grandfather Aajoba by Taruja Parande.

In the years since Richa Jha launched her independent publishing house Pickle Yolk Books, she has put together a small but well-curated list of books dealing with diversity, differences and now, death. Her new book is the story of Noorie, who has lost her sister Zoya, but finds herself unprepared for the overwhelming void it opens up in her life. She watches over her mother and her pet, Bruno, scared that they would leave her, too, frequents their favourite haunts where Zoya’s presence still lingers in the air. But, most of all, she is overcome by anger at her sister’s disappearance; at the overtures of Zoya’s best friend Dhara to draw her out, and, at her mother’s insistence that Zoya would always be a part of their lives.

Gautam Benegal’s evocative illustrations are the highlight of this beautiful volume. He captures Zoya’s disorientation and the messy nature of grief with great subtlety, aided in no small part by Jha’s economy of words and quiet understanding of the hollowness that loss engenders.”

Read the entire feature here.

Click here to know more about the book and here to buy a copy.